Horror Film Poster (Photo Gallery) Review: A Generational Debate for the Horror Fan

Someone posted this gallery on The Chive; and while I’m not really a Chive reader, I thought this was a great gallery. It’s also perfect for the divisive time period in which the horror world finds itself. People are constantly hating the remakes, with and without good reasons. My old blog was one that hated on practically every remake that was released. I even shed unnecessary hate on just about every film I watched. I am taking a much more positive approach this time around because I have found myself developing a much greater respect for filmmaking as a whole. I also have found that it is not worth my time to write about movies that are completely unwatchable anyway.

When it comes to comparing the posters, I feel like the newer films tend to have much scarier pictures. This is probably due to the fact that they can imply quite a bit more violence in today’s society. I like many of the newer posters because they also tend to just have a darker feeling, a tone of impending doom if you will. There are films listed below like:┬áIt’s Alive, The Grudge, 13 Ghosts, Village of the Damned, and Pirahna that I feel have done a great job of improving upon the older poster. It is hard to look at the modern improvements, however, without carrying your bias about the actual film into the picture. The House of Wax remake, for instance, is a complete piece of shit; but, I really like the newer poster. I even feel like the Rob Zombie Halloween poster is much better than the old one, despite the fact that the original is probably the most important slasher film ever made.

There are some original posters that just can’t be denied though. A Nightmare on Elm Street has an almost cartoonish quality to it, while still encapsulating the terrifying premise of the film. Dawn of the Dead, Night of the Living Dead, Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Children of the Corn, Fright Night, and The Evil Dead all have a vintage feel to them that I believe truly captures the terrifying nature of the films. It is strange that I just don’t get the same feeling from a vintage prints like the ones pictured for The Fly, The Thing, The Blob, and The Omen. I think, for me, there is a look that just seems too old to be scary. These preferences are probably also generational. The Evil Dead, Friday the 13th, and A Nightmare on Elm Street are the films that got me into horror. This means they are the most memorable for me, and probably my top three posters on this list. They came out around the same time, creating a sense of nostalgia that I get when looking at the poster. Someone older than me may remember The Blob or Psycho as the quintessential film of their childhood, thus making those posters their favorites. The much younger viewer will probably relate to the posters for The Grudge or The Ring despite the fact that those are films that many in my generation see as weak pop culture horror.

I don’t know. Take a look at the gallery and give me your thoughts. I don’t really need to rank them since I just told you my favorite classics and originals. Why don’t you add your thoughts in the comments and tell me how stupid I am.

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3 thoughts on “Horror Film Poster (Photo Gallery) Review: A Generational Debate for the Horror Fan”

  1. Interesting comparative on the classics compared to remakes, always was a fan of posters and felt they were sometimes just as important as the films themselves. Look forward to future posts.

    Like

  2. I think the really interesting thing for me is that a lot of the newer posters tend to exploit what we already know about the films, whilst the older ones obviously had to hide their best content so that people went to watch the films
    It’s bizarre to see how these films all just started out as normal, bog-standard movie releases, and ended up becoming classics
    And it’s the newer posters that show how iconic they’ve become
    The best example is the Friday the 13th picture, where the original poster attempts to hint at but essentially hide the main villain
    Whereas the new poster is just a huge picture of Jason, because by that point everyone knew who he was and that’s who they were going to want to see
    Sorry, a little ranty! But I just found it really interesting
    Great comparison!

    Liked by 1 person

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